Cheddar Gorge & Caves, Cheddar, Somerset – Review

Cheddar Gorge & Caves, Cheddar, Somerset – Review

While you are in Bristol there are a good selection of destinations and attractions you can reach. One of these is the Cheddar Gorge, only 40 minutes south of Bristol.

Cheddar Gorge is Britain’s biggest gorge with dramatic cliffs rising 450 over feet and amazing stalactite caverns. Cheddar Gorge is known world wide as being an area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

The first thing you should do is the cliff top walk and loop which brings you across the tops of the cliffs with views as far as the Glastonbury Tor. The loop continues through woods and then back to the village of Cheddar.

Cheddar Gorge

Cheddar Gorge

After that you should do the cave tours which tell you about Cheddar man a prehistoric man found in the caves which tells us much about how people lived back then. The audio guides are excellent and worth listening to.

The Spectacular Cheddar Caves

The Spectacular Cheddar Caves

The village of Cheddar is very picturesque and there are many tea houses selling tea cakes and crumpets or you can enjoy home made fudge, cider and of course the world famous Cheddar Cheese.

A visit to Cheddar gorge is a great day out. Just make sure you bring clothing for all conditions as it can change from sunny to cold and raining quite quickly.

Website : http://www.cheddargorge.co.uk/

Address : Cheddar Gorge & Caves, Cheddar, Somerset, BS27 3QF

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Avon Valley Railway, Steam Railway near Bristol – Attraction Review

Avon Valley Railway, Steam Railway near Bristol – Attraction Review

While you are in Bristol there are a good selection of destinations and attractions you can reach. One of these is the Avon Valley Railway located at Bitton.

The Avon Valley Railway is a 3 mile long heritage railway based at Bitton station in South Gloucestershire. The railway follows the Avon Valley south-east from Oldland Common, through Bitton and alongside the River Avon towards Bath. The railway shares its route with the very popular Sustrans cycleway and footpath, the Bristol & Bath Railway Path.

The Avon Valley Railway station at Bitton, is an original Midland Railway station which was restored by volunteer members who now run this line. Car parking is provided for customers so there are no worries about getting there and parking. The Station building itself holds the Booking Hall and ticket Office. There are many posters and signs from the golden age of steam in the station.

Your conductor or ticket inspector, dressed in an accurate uniform, allows you board the train.

The Avon Valley Railway was a new experience for me having never been on a steam train from that era. The steam train had the individual compartments seating 4 adults.

The train only runs on a section of the line running from Bitton to Avon Riverside and then on to Oldland. This journey takes about 30 minutes. It is well worth it and was certainly a highlight of the area for me.  If you are looking for things to do near Bristol then don’t miss this, it is so enjoyable.

There is a restaurant on site but food can take up to 30 minutes on busy days, so probably best to get a drink and relax while waiting for your food.

Address: Bath Rd, Bristol, South Gloucestershire BS30 6HD, United Kingdom

Website : http://www.avonvalleyrailway.org

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Loftus Hall Tour – Visit Irelands Most Haunted House

Do you believe in ghosts? Do you believe that the devil himself left a card game through the room and that hole in the roof cannot be repaired?

If not, (or even if you do) then a visit to Loftus Hall in Co. Wexford, Ireland just might change your mind. The house is now open again and running very well organised hour long tours which bring you through the history, and horrors of the house. You may even catch a glimpse of the ghostly Lady Anna or one of the other demons.

I was a small bit sceptical about how this old house could be the setting for a tour but I was proved very wrong within the first 5 minutes. The tour guides are very well prepared and give you a lot of history and facts to digest. I’m not going to give anything away are there are a few interactive elements to the tour also. For me the highlight (if you can call it that) was the visit to the tapestry room which is the most haunted room in the house, as I felt a real drop in temperature in this room, apparently associated with spirits.

It was a very well run tour and I might even be tempted to return for the more sinister adult only tour which is a lot darker and guided only by candlelight (which often goes out I was informed). Shortly after writing this post, one person took an unexplained photo with a potential ghost. The news story hit national press and went viral online so if you are interested in the paranormal, Loftus Hall is certainly one for you.

Tickets are €5 for children (who must be accompanied by at least 1 adult) and €9 for adults.

A great tour, my only gripe is that if you do the tour your parking should be validated as it is €2 to exit the car park otherwise.

Website : http://www.loftushall.com/

Location: Loftus Hall, Hook Peninsula, Co. Wexford

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Museum of Brands, Packaging and Advertising, London – Attraction Review

Museum of Brands, Packaging and Advertising, London – Attraction Review

The Museum of Brands, Packaging and Advertising in London brings to life the history of consumer culture all the way from Victorian times to today.

It is an amazing history of brands, packaging and advertising. Within the museum there are adverts, thousands of actual examples of branding, packaging. You can examine the difference in packaging of products over decades, seeing how a products design changes with the times. This museum will certainly bring back memories of products from your childhood. As well as products and brands there are also items of fashion, magazines and items from historical events e.g. The Queen’s Jubilee memorabilia and so on.

I saw many packages from my childhood here as well as many products which are no longer on sale, or indeed products which flopped or were discontinued.

The Museum is located near Notting Hill gate and is just a few minutes walk from the world famous Portobello Road. It is located in the fashionable Notting Hill are of London, the neighbourhood has a distinctive, small-village feel popularised by the film of the same name.

At the The Museum of Brands, Packaging and Advertising you will see see Rimmel cosmetics from the 1890’s, First World War OXO Cubes, Mars Bars, Rolo’s and Kit Kat from the 1930’s, a 1970’s Chopper Bike, a 1980’s Spectrum home computer  and around 12,000 other items that will open your eyes to the way we lived and shopped.

The Museum of Brands, Packaging and Advertising is a very interesting attraction, especially if you have an interest in advertising, packaging and marketing. Slightly off the beaten track but worth visiting.

Admission
Admission is £6.50 for adults and £2.25 for children. Family Tickets are £15.

Address
2 Colville Mews, Lonsdale Road, Notting Hill, London, W11 2AR

Phone
+44 (0)20 7908 0880

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